Friday, June 14, 2019

Zoo News Digest 14th June 2019 (ZooNews 1032)

Zoo News Digest 14th June 2019  (ZooNews 1032)

@crazytapirlady



elvinhow@gmail.com

 

Dear Colleague,


There has been much of interest this past few days but the link that jumped out at me was WATCH: Workers demonstrate over unfair treatment at Pretoria Zoo . I have often wondered how I would react. Strikes in zoos are rare but I can see how it can be necessary. In my case I could never strike if my action in any way compromised the health and welfare of the animals....but what if the strike was because the health and welfare was being compromised? Difficult. Resignation would hardly be a realistic option as it would help no-one and especially in these dark days of non disclosure agreements.
In my own case I got my first zoo job (in 1967/8) because of a zookeeper strike. All of the striking zookeepers were dismissed and so they were desperate for staff. It was a steep learning curve being thrown in at the deep end but I knew from day one that this was the life for me and never regretted it. I was lucky too in that the head keeper I was working under was patient and an excellent teacher as well as being a really nice guy.
Many many years later I was head hunted to manage a major British Safari Park. It would have been a good move. The salary was excellent as were the benefits. I had a young family at the time and it really wasn't something I could afford to pass up. However I turned it down...Why? Because I was told in no uncertain terms that one of the first duties expected of me was to get rid of one of the staff. Who? Well it was the first head keeper (now in a senior role) I had worked under and from whom I had learned so much.


"good zoos will not gain the credibility of their critics until they condemn the bad zoos wherever they are." Peter Dickinson

Lots of interest follows

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Did You Know?
ZooNews Digest has over 110,400+ Followers on Facebook( and over 110,500 likes) and has a monthly reach often exceeding over 1000,000 people? That ZooNews Digest has subscribers in over 900 Zoos in 155+ countries? That the subscriber list for the mail out reads like a 'Zoos Who's Who?'
If you are a subscriber to the email version then you probably knew this already. You would also know that ZooNews Digest pre-dates any of the others. It was there before FaceBook. It was there shortly after the internet became popular and was a 'Blog' before the word had been invented. ZooNews Digest reaches zoo people.

I remain committed to the work of GOOD zoos,
not DYSFUNCTIONAL zoos.
********
*****
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Chorus of Life: Protecting endangered Asian elephants in Xishuangbanna
Wild Asian elephants, with a population of about 300, are under class-A protection in China. Almost all the elephants are found in China's southwestern Yunnan Province and the majority of them call Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture home.

In 2008, a breeding and rescue center was set up in Xishuangbanna to help this endangered species. Since then, the center has rescued more than 10 injured wild elephants, which were either deserted by their herds or used by humans to smuggle drugs


Audio: Bronx Zoo director argues zoos are more relevant to conservation than ever
The Bronx Zoo is part of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). As executive vice president of zoos and aquariums for WCS, Jim Breheny actually manages all five of WCS’s zoological parks in New York City, including the Bronx Zoo, the Central Park Zoo, the Queens Zoo, the Prospect Park Zoo, and the New York Aquarium on Coney Island. All told, these parks are visited by more than 4 million guests every year.



Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Western Australia, provides further insight into the social habits of these remarkable animals.



When the gibbons call
The call of gibbons was louder when we went further inside the forest area of Mo Singto in Khao Yai National Park, which covers 2,165km² in four provinces in the central and northeastern regions. Mo Singto...



Indian temple helps nurture ‘extinct’ turtle back to life
An “extinct” species of turtle is being reintroduced to the wild after a small population was found flourishing in a pond at an Indian temple.

The black softshell turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) was declared extinct in the wild 17 years ago by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. However, in Hayagriva Madhav temple in Assam, these reptiles are believed to be a reincarnation of Hindu deity Vishnu and so they are protected.

Jayaditya Purkayastha, from conservation group Good Earth which is working to protect the remaining turtles at Hayagriva Madhav temple, told AFP: “There are plenty of turtles in the temple pond.



The evolution of zoos and zookeepers
Things are always changing at the zoo and in the zoo world. Right now at Lee Richardson Zoo, the birds are nesting, the Nature Trail is seeing improvements, and a few planting projects are adding more color to our surroundings. Behind the scenes, we are working with architects and construction managers on the plans for the new primate habitat, the new flamingo habitat and the expansion of the animal health facility.

Changes don’t just happen at facilities; they happen across the profession, too. As with other professions or businesses, zoo work involves more and more technology as time goes by. What used to be very basic in design, containment, and care — and did not really focus much on conservation or public education — has taken leaps and bounds from where it began. Even in my 35 years in the profession, the changes have been numerous.



Chester Zoo conservationists release 4,000 snails that were believed to be extinct into the wild
The greater Bermuda land snail (Poecilozonites bermudensis) which measure around 2cm live only on the remote, oceanic islands of Bermuda.

They were driven almost to extinction by species of carnivorous snails and flatworms and were feared to have vanished completely until a small number were rediscovered in 2014. The snails are listed as critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).



WATCH: Workers demonstrate over unfair treatment at Pretoria Zoo
Pretoria - Educational trips for school children and visitors to the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa had to be rescheduled as workers took to the entrance of the Zoo to picket over unfair treatment of employees.

Workers led by the National Trade Union Congress were given the go-ahead to picket by the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation, and Arbitration, as of May 21.



Monkeys face climate change extinction threat
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an "elevated risk of extinction," according to a new University of Stirling-led study.

The research, involving an international team of scientists, found that a large percentage of non-human primates -- including monkeys, lemurs and apes -- are facing substantial temperature increases and marked habitat changes over the next 30 years.

The team, led by Dr Joana Carvalho of Stirling's Faculty of Natural Sciences, said that New World monkeys -- which live primarily in tropical South America -- will be particularly affected.



Joburg Zoo gets 2 friends for lonely Lammie the elephant
The Joburg Zoo said in a statement two elephants secured a clean bill of health and arrived at the Zoo with the veterinary doctor and their keeper on Thursday.

Ramadiba, 22-year-old a mature male and Mopani, a 19-year-old female, will be allowed to get accustomed to their surroundings before they make their public debut on World Elephant Day, 12 August which coincidently, is on the same day that Lammie turns 40.



The slow and steady conservation of the Asian Giant Tortoises
They are famous because they battled petty criminals, overlords, mutated creatures and alien invaders, all the while trying and mostly succeeding to stay hidden. They are famous, for they were cursed and are now manifestations of an evil spirit stuck in a pond for eternity at a shrine in the depths of Chattogram. They are famous because writers, moviemakers, shamans, philosophers, kung fu fighters alike have been fascinated by their slow and steady gait and their resilience. Yet, thousands of years on, this very resilience is under threat. If you have not guessed by now, I am talking about the order Testudines of the animal kingdom, which includes turtles and tortoises.



Toward More Equitable and Inclusive Spaces for Primatology and Primate Conservation
Professional societies, especially international ones, are strengthened by including adiversity of members from a variety of communities. The International PrimatologicalSociety as well as other societies have recognized the importance of these strengths byforming new committees dedicated to issues of equity, inclusion, and diversity. Yet it isimperative that such efforts move beyond checking the boxes for how many differentgroups of people we have in our membership toward institutional changes that trans-form the society and create safe inclusive spaces where everyone who wishes to joincan fully engage in the work of the society. For



A Global Review of Animal–Visitor Interactions in Modern Zoos and Aquariums and Their Implications for Wild Animal Welfare
This study explores the characteristics of animal-visitor Interactions (AVIs) (interactions between people and captive wild animals) in zoos and aquaria across the globe. We reviewed information provided on public websites of institutions that are either direct members of the World Association for Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) or belong to regional and national associations that have WAZA membership. The opportunity for visitors to interact with wild animals was promoted on the majority of the facilities’ websites. Petting captive wild animals was the most common AVI activity advertised (43%) of facilities, and interaction with mammals was the most advertised taxonomic class (53%). Some activities involving direct contact with wildlife were promoted more commonly than expected (for example, hand feed and ride wild animals, and walk with or swim through wild animal enclosures). Some of the advertised AVIs have the potential to impact animal welfare; in light of this, we provide recommendations to balance and manage captive wild animal welfare in AVIs with other primary interconnected goals.



SEA LIFE Career Story
Here at SEA LIFE we love our animals and employees! Our aim is to inspire love and care for the oceans. That's why we've put together an inspiring interview with one of our very own stars, with a unique story to tell and valuable career advice. Our first featured employee is Chris Sturdy, Curator for SEA LIFE Great Yarmouth.



Fake news destroying Thailand's elephant tourism industry (17 May 2019): Part 1
Investigation into the story of "Pang Meena", a 4-year-old elephant, after a foreign citizen. Those who shared the story of the thin, abused elephant posted a photo of the wrong elephant!
As proof of fate "Phang Mina - Chang Noi, 4 years old" behind the documentary, the head of the outside, raising the knot, hook-chaining, attacking the Thai elephant industry People sharing the same elephant as Maetang - Chiang Mai Interpreter attached to the pole - abused until thin Both wrong
Account Translator's Note *: the The Article In The Original Thai language audio Bible stories, Concerning The true true time story is Meena Of The Elephant, Can Be Found By Following This Link:.



Seal Pup Born at Reykjavík Zoo Raises Ethical Concerns
Kobba, one of two female seals that live at the Reykjavík Family Park and Zoo gave birth to a seal pup on Tuesday night, Vísir reports. While the pup, who has yet to be sexed by zoo staff, is feeding well and appears to be in good health, following its mother wherever she goes, its birth has raised concerns about the suitability of the zoo’s seal habitat as well as the pup’s future.



Police Looking for Woman Who Fatally Injured Greek Turtle at Budapest Zoo
An unknown perpetrator hit a Greek turtle at the Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden with a stone on Wednesday afternoon. The animal was later found by caretakers at the pre-closure check, but its injuries were so severe that the veterinarians could not save the animal and it had to be euthanized.

In order to clarify the exact circumstances of the case, the zoo watched the recordings of the surveillance cameras on Thursday morning,




 Joy as Chester Zoo elephant calf makes full recovery from deadly EEHV illness
CHESTER ZOO bosses are hailing a major milestone after its 'brave little fighter' elephant has made a full recovery from a deadly virus.

Indali Hi Way is believed to be a rare case of an Asian elephant surviving the lethal EEHV illness, also known as elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus, a deadly virus threatening Asian elephants globally.

A large team of specialists continues to watch her



Complaint claims abusive conditions for dolphins at Madrid Zoo
After an hour, the music stops and the woman bids the visitors goodbye while the dolphins sink under the surface of the semi-circular pool they inhabit 24/7. They withdraw with their ever-present smiles that are not smiles at all. The fact is, even if they were sad, they would appear to be grinning. A veterinary report sent to Seprona – the nature protection arm of the Spanish Civil Guard – concludes that the nine dolphins at Madrid Zoo Aquarium are, in fact, sick. They have eye problems and two of them, Lala and Guarina, have skin lesions.



2 giraffes killed by lightning at Florida wildlife park
Officials at a Florida wildlife park say two giraffes that died last month were killed by lightning.
Lion Country Safari posted Tuesday on Facebook that recent pathology results confirmed that the giraffes died as a result of a lightning strike and that the deaths were instantaneous.



Third tiger safari to open near Hampi
In what is seen as a bid to boost tourism and sensitise visitors on conservation, the State’s third tiger safari is all set to open near Hampi, a world heritage site.

The tiger and lion safari at Kamalapur, near Hampi, in Ballari district — third after the safaris at Bannerghatta in Bengaluru and Tyavarekoppa in Shivamogga — will be formally launched on June 21.



Video highlights animal cruelty at Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo
On the heels of a National Geographic report exposing cruelty in the animal-tourism industry, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has obtained new video footage showing animals suffering at Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo.




Nakhon Si Thammarat zoo set to close after 40 years of public service
The only public zoo in the upper southern region, Thung Talard in Nakhon Si Thammarat, is to officially end its four-decade-long service at the request of local authorities.

The reasons behind the closure are still unclear, but the zoo was criticised on social-media platforms last month about its hygiene, animal health and living standards. The request to end the service was initiated by the mayor of Nakhon Si Thammarat, and put forward to the Natural Parks, Wildlife and Plants Department on April 9



Viral: Outrage over filthy conditions at mini-zoo in West Java, including trash inside cages and animals being fed rotten fruits
There have been many stories about zoos in Indonesia horribly mistreating their animals. Recently, yet another local zoo has come under fire after pictures showing the facility’s disturbing conditions went viral on social media.

The facility, a mini-zoo located inside a Kostrad (Army Strategic Command) compound in the Cilodong sub-district of Depok City, West Java, became the talk of the netizens after a user uploaded several pictures showcasing its awful conditions yesterday.




3 experts explain why orca breeding is so important




An Open Letter to the Producers of the CBS “Whistleblower” Program
On behalf of the accredited members of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), including SeaWorld, I am writing to you today to express our strong concerns about your program titled “SeaWorld: The Case Against Captivity.”

Based on the previews of your program to date, we believe the content you are airing provides viewers with an untrue picture of current SeaWorld practices. For example, SeaWorld no longer allows its professionally trained staff go in the water with orcas and has changed its safety practices when working with orcas. Additionally, SeaWorld is no longer breeding orcas, which would also include using artificial insemination techniques on the animals.



Cooperative Feeding; A Training Essential
Being in a position to work with a variety of different species allows me to observe species I never had the chance to observe before. I learn a lot. Observation is an important part of our day. A head trainer once asked me, “do we really know our animals if we just train them and never observe in free time?”
https://zoospensefull.com/2019/06/10/cooperative-feeding-a-training-essential






Can you be a victim of a displaced animal?
The theory of animal training helped me a great deal until I worked with orcas. But little did I know that my skills would then be tested constantly along the way. A sea-lion was one thing, moving on to a killer whale was another. I got this job through a good friend of mine that I met on conference in 2008, since then we have kept in regular contact and one of the topics we always discuss is how a trainer can gain the success they need to grow in this field.



'A more humane country': Canada to ban keeping whales, dolphins in captivity
Animal welfare advocates are celebrating a "defining moment" after the House of Commons voted Monday to ban keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity — ushering in an uncertain future for the Marineland in Niagara Falls.

Bill S-203, known as the "Ending the Captivity of Whales and Dolphins Act," passed a third reading in the House of Commons Monday, more than three years after it was introduced in December 2015.

The bill bans keeping and breeding cetaceans — including whales, dolphins and porpoises — through amendments to the Criminal Code, and would levy fines to lawbreakers of up to $200,000. However, whales and dolphins t



Zoo Director Testifies Before Congress on Biodiversity
Thank you Chairwoman Johnson, Ranking Member Lucas, and distinguished members of the Committee for the opportunity to provide testimony to you today. My name is Steve Monfort and I am the Director of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute. Today, I am also honored to represent my Smithsonian colleagues from our Environmental Research Center, our Tropical Research Institute, the National Museum of Natural History, and others united under the umbrella of the Smithsonian’s Conservation Commons, an institution-wide effort designed to unite our cumulative expertise to tackle complex conservation problems on a global scale.

At the National Zoo we care for some of the rarest species on earth, and along with that comes a moral and ethical responsibility to connect the work we do with individual animals in our care to saving their counterparts in nature. But lesser known is that the Smithsonian has been studying biodiversity for more than 170 years, and today hundreds of Smithsonian scientists and scholars work across the spectrum of biodiversity and conservation



Simply returning rescued wildlife back to the wild may not be in their best interest
There are few checks done to see how well injured or orphaned Australian animals survive after they’ve been released into the wild, we found in our new research published on Sunday.

That’s a worry for the more than 50,000 native animals that are released in Australia each year. It’s especially worrying for any orphans who’ve never experienced life in the wild.

But we found the rules governing the return of wildlife are not always in the animal’s best interest.



Chimpanzee meat 'being eaten at weddings and sold on market stalls in Britain'
Illegal chimpanzee meat is being served at weddings and sold on market stalls in the UK, it has been claimed.

In the past month a ton of the animal's flesh - known as bush meat - was confiscated at customs as it came into the UK from West Africa, leading primate scientist Dr Ben Garrod said.


The meat can cause serious diseases as chimps are genetically similar to humans and it is often packaged in unsanitary environments.



Carl Hagenbeck: The inventor of the modern animal park
No bars, no high fences: It's thanks to Carl Hagenbeck that most zoos today look that way. June 10 marks his 175th birthday. But he also had other controversial ideas for his parks: exhibiting humans as well.



Across China: 25 rare wild horses await mates in China
Summer is the best season for those living on the grassland in a semi-desert area in Urumqi, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, but for 25 mares it has been tough for the past three years.

They are Przewalski's horses, native to the Steppes of Central Asia and considered the only true wild horse in existence today.

Once extinct in China, they were successfully reintroduced to the country in the 1980s from Europe, yet are still on the brink of extinction as mating has become a big challenge in their conservation.



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After more than 50 years working in private, commercial and National zoos in the capacity of keeper, head keeper and curator Peter Dickinson started to travel. He sold house and all his possessions and hit the road. He has traveled extensively in Turkey, Southern India and much of South East Asia before settling in Thailand. In his travels he has visited well over 200 zoos and many more before 'hitting the road' and writes about these in his blog http://zoonewsdigest.blogspot.com/Hubpages http://hubpages.com/profile/Peter+Dickinson
Peter earns his living as an independent international zoo consultant, critic and writer. Until recently working as Curator of Penguins in Ski Dubai. United Arab Emirates. He describes himself as an itinerant zoo keeper, one time zoo inspector, a dreamer, a traveler, an introvert, a people watcher, a lover, a storyteller, a thinker, a cosmopolitan, a writer, a hedonist, an explorer, a pantheist, a gastronome, sometime fool, a good friend to some and a pain in the butt to others.
"These are the best days of my life"


photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant







Monday, June 10, 2019

Zoo News Digest 10th June 2019 (ZooNews 1031)

Zoo News Digest 10th June 2019  (ZooNews 1031)


Photography by @nerdbirder





elvinhow@gmail.com

 

Dear Colleague,


It's a bit like a red rag to a bull when someone reports one of my ZooNews Digests posts to Facebook and has it removed for checking. Why? Who? And what are they trying to hide? I asked Facebook to review it but that can take forever so I posted it out again. The second time it wasn't stopped.
It isn't the first time this has happened. Before Facebook came along I had, on several occasions, emails from certain people asking me, even offering me money, not to post out certain articles. I did not and do not accept bribes. At the other end of the scale I had people offering me money to promote certain posts. Again not accepted. I make the choice as to whether it is of interest. Nobody else. At the same time I am more than happy to accept a small financial reward for promoting products which I could see would be of value to the world zoo community... it hasn't happened yet, in spite of the huge international zoo readership. The same companies though have offered me money for my email database. Always turned down and always will be.

Almost weekly I will have messages or emails from a small clique of self proclaimed zoo experts (trolls) telling me what I should not have posted because they disagreed with the article. Well so what? I post out a ton of stuff that I don't agree with but that's not the point. They should read https://hubpages.com/animals/Is-ZooNews-Digest-Pro-Zoo-or-Anti-Zoo though some do and still disagree with that. Actually I am getting sick and tired of some of the personal attacks on ZooNews Digest that for the first time in, what is it 30 years? I am going to start deleting mischief making ignorant comments. No apologies necessary.

There has been a lot of discussion on some of the links on the ZooNews Digest Facebook page these past few days. One of the statements in the comments was this "the AR people will come for you and yours next. It's a matter of time. Nobody will be exempt. We need to protect our own,"
You will see the same statement worded in different ways time and time again. It is one that I completely disagree with. We should NOT protect our own. We need to condemn the BAD. We need to close them down. BAD zoos do not deserve our protection. GOOD zoos need to stick together and get rid of the bad because it is they who are causing us the greatest harm and not the Animal Rights Anarchists.

I was delighted to read $20 million deal signed to save Arabian leopard population I just hope that some of this money goes towards The Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife. They have done more work for and with the Arabian Leopard and yet very rarely ever get credit or mention.

Was I surprised to see Chimpanzee meat being eaten in UK as border force urged to bring in DNA testing ? well actually not at all. I am surprised that no other newspapers have followed up on the story so far. It is though not actually new news and has been going on for years. Bushmeat has become a delicacy to the rich. I have no problems with bushmeat being caught by a poor peasant farmer to feed a hungry family but when it is for a lucrative export market it becomes very wrong.

As to queries about my health. I had a stroke. A quite unexpected and unpleasant experience. I reckon I was quite lucky as friends and colleagues of mine have had far worse. All the same it is making life really quite difficult right now. It is a bit of a surprise to me to find how much I used my left arm to tackle various things. Now I am having to teach it to do those same things. It is not easy when you live alone but most bar girls I know have hearts of gold.



"good zoos will not gain the credibility of their critics until they condemn the bad zoos wherever they are." Peter Dickinson

Lots of interest follows

*********

Did You Know?
ZooNews Digest has over 110,400+ Followers on Facebook( and over 110,500 likes) and has a monthly reach often exceeding over 1000,000 people? That ZooNews Digest has subscribers in over 900 Zoos in 155+ countries? That the subscriber list for the mail out reads like a 'Zoos Who's Who?'
If you are a subscriber to the email version then you probably knew this already. You would also know that ZooNews Digest pre-dates any of the others. It was there before FaceBook. It was there shortly after the internet became popular and was a 'Blog' before the word had been invented. ZooNews Digest reaches zoo people.

I remain committed to the work of GOOD zoos,
not DYSFUNCTIONAL zoos.
********
*****
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Coffee culture that cares for our environment
Coffee culture that cares for our environment – we’ll drink to that!

Auckland Zoo is delighted to be introducing the innovative Again Again zero waste to landfill coffee cup lending scheme to its coffee, tea and hot chocolate loving visitors – a move that will eliminate the use of 160,000 single-use compostable cups a year!



 Misleading Information About SeaWorld In ‘Whistleblower’
On June 7, 2019, CBS aired an episode of the show Whistleblower focusing on SeaWorld’s treatment of the killer whales in its care. The production centers on the experience of John Hargrove and two other former SeaWorld trainers. Over his career, Hargrove worked as a killer whale trainer at SeaWorld San Antonio, SeaWorld San Diego, and Marineland Antibes in France. The other SeaWorld employees worked at SeaWorld San Diego. One was another orca trainer, and the other worked with walruses.

The episode “makes the case” against orca captivity. It argues that killer whales are unfit for life in human care and are, in fact, suffering at SeaWorld. While the stories told by the former trainers are emotionally unsettling, many of the claims made are inaccurate and misleading.



The Revered Crocodiles of This Island Nation Have Suddenly Started Killing People
The two scientists, crammed in the back of a sweltering car, had come a long way hoping to encounter what most people try to avoid: man-eating crocodiles.

Yusuke Fukuda and Sam Banks, biologists from Australia, traveled in March to East Timor, one of the world’s least developed countries, to investigate what has become a national mystery: Why are so many Timorese being killed by crocodiles?

Crocodile attacks here have increased 20-fold in the past decade, numbering at least one death a month in a country of 1.2 million people.

“We became concerned after many people were



Baby elephant born in Pairi Daiza
Animal park Pairi Daiza in Brugelette in Hainaut province this weekend welcomed a new arrival, with the birth of a baby elephant on Friday night-Saturday morning.

The baby is the fourth to be born in the park, and the fourth offspring of 16-year-old mother Farina, whose first two calves were born while she was at Hannover Zoo in Germany.



PR firm withdraws after lifting of elephant ban in Botswana splits opinion
When Botswana, home to about one-third of the world’s African elephants, lifted its hunting ban in May, leaders knew they were courting controversy. The government even hired a public relations firm specialising in Hollywood celebrities to spin public opinion to its side.

For President Mokgweetsi Masisi, the need to end the ban was obvious. Rural farmers have borne the brunt of the near-tripling of the elephant population since 1991, to 130,000. As many as 50 Botswanans have been killed by elephants since the ban was implemented in 2014 and hundreds of reports of property damage have been filed. Botswana is also facing in October its most competitive election since independence in 1966 and Masisi needs rural support.



MORE RUBBISH FROM THE ANIMAL RIGHTS ANARCHISTS
Zoos Cause Animals Far More Harm Than Good
While zoos masquerade as prime exemplars of wildlife conservation efforts, when closely examined they cause the captive animals in modern zoos significantly more suffering and deprivation than well-being and life enrichment.



Dilemmas for Natural Living Concepts of Zoo Animal Welfare
his ethical discourse specifically deals with dilemmas encountered within zoological institutions, namely for the concept of natural living, and a new term—wilding. Wilding refers to extrapolation of the natural living concept to treating an animal as wild, residing in a wild habitat. The problems associated with wilding are detailed. Complexities of natural living versus natural aesthetics as judged by humans, as well as the possibility of innate preference for naturalness within animals are examined. It is argued that unintended and unavoidable genetic and epigenetic drift favouring adaptations for life in a captive environment may still occur, despite zoos best efforts to prevent this from occurring. This article further discusses the blurred lines between natural and unnatural behaviours, and the overlaps with more important highly-motivated behaviours, which may be better predictors of positive a



Sudden death of orangutan upsets zoo during the traditional Chinese Dragon Boat Festival
Hongshan Forest Zoo released the obituary the day following Leshen's death. The orangutan escaped from its cage and jumped around between trees and buildings. The zookeepers kept using food to attract the uncontrolled animal and calling him back to his place, but Leshen continued to run away until he reached the pathway.


17-18 July



Why Condemning SeaWorld Is A Really Bad Idea
Keyboard warriors and animal activists alike have been jumping on the SeaWorld bandwagon for a while now and attempting to convert ordinary people to support their cause with as little validated, balanced information as possible.

In some cases, this has been successful, especially when said activists conceal their true radical agenda within the guise of “progressive animal welfare.”


Behind the closed doors of Manila Zoo
When I was a kid, I would always tell my mom that I wanted to adopt a dog. She would only always respond with a dismissive tsk!

When I grew up and started earning my own money, I did the next best thing: I volunteered for an animal welfare organization. I was happy to be surrounded by people who share the same passion that I have for animals. But more than that, I felt so fulfilled being able to finally do something I really love – taking care of animals.


Bereaved penguin parents embark on killer rampage: Pair of birds kill two adults and two chicks at German zoo after their own egg failed to hatch and is taken away by staff



Attention-Grabbing Apes: Studying Gorilla and Orangutan Gestures
We are experiencing a very unique moment in time at the Great Ape House. When our western lowland gorilla Moke was born in April 2018 to mother, Calaya, it marked the first birth of this species at the Zoo since January 2009, when Kibibi was born. On the orangutan side of the building, Redd’s birth in September 2016 was also a special occasion. Prior to his arrival, the last orangutan birth at the Zoo was 25 years ago.

  

Kamo's big cat sanctuary takes a leap toward compliance
There could be a roar of delight from prospective visitors if a flurry of activity at the Kamo Wildlife Sanctuary means the former troubled big cat zoo could reopen soon.

Or, it could just mean Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has given the wildlife park's owners a hurry-up in meeting long laid down codes of compliance concerns.

Major rehabilitation of the park and its enclosures has been under way — at varying pace — since 2014 when it was ordered to stay closed by Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) because it didn't comply with regulations.



Cincinnati Zoo Wins Transfer Order, Federal Judge Sets Return Date For Gorilla Ndume
A federal judge in California is granting the Cincinnati Zoo's request to transfer a gorilla named "Ndume" to Cincinnati on June 13, despite objections from The Gorilla Foundation where he's been living since 1991.

Judge Richard Seeborg didn't go into details in his decision, writing only, "This matter having come before the Court on Plaintiff [Cincinnati Zoo's] Request for Enforcement of Transfer Order, it is hereby ordered that Plaintiff's request for relief is granted. This Court hereby orders [The Gorilla Foundation] to cooperate in good faith and in all respects to effectuate the transfer of Ndume from California to Ohio on June 13, 2019."

The Gorilla Foundation had opposed the Cincinnati Zoo's Thursday request that the judge set a June 13 transfer date, filing its opposition mid-day Friday.



No one knows how many bears are left in Taiwan
In the foothills leading to Dasyueshan National Park in eastern Taiwan, Mei-Hsiu Hwang points to the pear, tea and betel nut plantations patchworking the slopes.

"All this used to be bear habitat," she says. In particular, the Formosan black bear, a large omnivore n



$20 million deal signed to save Arabian leopard population
A $20 million deal to save Arabian leopards has been signed between the Royal Commission for Al-Ula (RCU) and Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization.
The Arabian leopard population is critically endangered, meaning it faces an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild, according to the definition provided by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Panthera President Dr. Fred Launay said the Arabian leopard subspecies was estimated to number fewer than 200 in the wild, with its population driven down in recent years due to loss of habitat and prey, followed by persecution in livestock areas.



India heatwave: Desperation for water thought to have made 15 monkeys kill each other
A “rare and strange” fight over water may be the reason behind the deaths of more than a dozen monkeys in India, forest officials have said.

A boy from a village in Madhya Pradesh, a state in central India, earlier this week found a number of monkey corpses in a forest near Punjapura.

A forest department team sent to investigate the scene on Thursday said they found 15 carcasses inside and outside caves in the forest, which has been baking under temperatures of up to 45C in recent days.



Elephant rides to stop at Cambodia’s biggest attraction
Cruel elephant rides at a famous temple in Cambodia are now coming to an end.

The overworked group of 14 elephants will no longer be forced to work at Angkor Wat, where over 2.5 million international tourists visit each year.

They will be transferred to a conservation and breeding centre by early 2020, the The Angkor Elephant Group Committee confirmed.

In 2016, an elephant collapsed and died while ferrying two tourists to the monument, sparking international outrage at the practice.



‘Illegal trade in bear parts posing threat to animal’
Widespread illegal trade in bear bile and gall bladder for traditional medicine across Malaysia is potentially a serious threat to wild bears, says TRAFFIC, a wildlife trade monitoring network.

Traffic South-East Asia senior communications officer Elizabeth John said a 2015 survey of 365 traditional medicine shops across Malaysia, found 48% claimed to sell bear gall bladders and medicinal products containing bear bile.



Chimpanzee meat being eaten in UK as border force urged to bring in DNA testing
Chimpanzee meat is being served as a delicacy at British weddings and sold as 'bush meat' on market stalls, it has emerged.

The border force is under pressure to introduce DNA testing to identify the meat at customs and has said it would be investing in new technology to tackle the rising issue.



Of Whales and Man: The Story of Whale Trainer John J.Hargrove
John. J Hargrove is a killer whale trainer at SeaWorld San Antonio who I first met in August 2010 during a camp that I attended at the time. There, John shared with us his story of how he got started in working with killer whales before going on to share some stories about his experience working with these large marine mammals. He has been working with killer whales at SeaWorld parks in California and Texas, and Marine Land in France for the past eighteen years. His intellect and life story is a very interesting case of how one person’s passion for animals and the sea can sometime



Southern Indiana zoo confirms hyena bit employee; PETA demands action
Hyenas have jaws strong enough to break bone, and the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) said one recently attacked a worker at a southern Indiana roadside zoo.

PETA made details of the reported attack public Friday. The incident happened at Wildlife In Need, a hands-on zoo that's attracted plenty of criticism from animal rights advocates like PETA.



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After more than 50 years working in private, commercial and National zoos in the capacity of keeper, head keeper and curator Peter Dickinson started to travel. He sold house and all his possessions and hit the road. He has traveled extensively in Turkey, Southern India and much of South East Asia before settling in Thailand. In his travels he has visited well over 200 zoos and many more before 'hitting the road' and writes about these in his blog http://zoonewsdigest.blogspot.com/Hubpages http://hubpages.com/profile/Peter+Dickinson
Peter earns his living as an independent international zoo consultant, critic and writer. Until recently working as Curator of Penguins in Ski Dubai. United Arab Emirates. He describes himself as an itinerant zoo keeper, one time zoo inspector, a dreamer, a traveler, an introvert, a people watcher, a lover, a storyteller, a thinker, a cosmopolitan, a writer, a hedonist, an explorer, a pantheist, a gastronome, sometime fool, a good friend to some and a pain in the butt to others.
"These are the best days of my life"


photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant