Thursday, April 30, 2020

Mystery Surrounding The Export of Chimpanzees to China


Chimpanzees | WWF


Mystery Surrounding The Export of Chimpanzees to China

In July 2019 18 Chimpanzees were exported to China. They had CITES documentation but these show significant non-compliances with CITES and with the South African CITES Regulations, 2010.

WHERE WERE THESE CHIMPANZEES BRED?
 Perhaps somebody from PAAZA can answer the question.

This export has strong similarities to the Taiping Four case but less questions are being asked. Probably because it is Chimpanzees and not Gorillas,

The exporter was Hartbeespoort Snake and Zoo Park in North West Province, but it appears that Ms. Christa Saayman from Mystic Monkeys and Feathers Wildlife Park in Limpopo Province, acted as the export agent.

The importer was Beijing Green Landscape Zoo, also known as Beijing Wildlife Park (BWP). 18 chimpanzees arrived in China but it is understood that BWP only has 15. It is unclear where the remaining 3 are. There is no evidence that they were returned to South Africa, but there is some information that they may possibly have been taken to Jinan Zoo.

Chimpanzees are listed on Annex 1 of CITES. In terms of the “fundamental principles” of the Convention, Annex 1 species are those “threatened with extinction which are or may be affected by trade. Trade in specimens of these species must be subject to particularly strict regulation in order not to endanger 2 further their survival and must only be authorized in exceptional circumstances.”

It is understood that some of these Chimpanzees were pregnant at the time of export.










photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Chimelong Marine Science Park






Chimelong Marine Science Park

Chimelong Marine Science Park was supposedly to open on the 1st May but because of the Covid -19 pandemic I can assume there will be some delays.
See renderings of construction HERE

Currently 103 cetaceans are maintained at the Zhuhai Chimelong Ocean Kingdom. These are:

22 bottlenose Dolphins, 43 Beluga Whales, 1 False Killer Whale, 5 Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, 9 Killer Whales, 10 Pacific white-sided dolphin and 7 Pantropical spotted dolphin.


The new breeding center aims to “help cultivate the public’s awareness of whale protection, develop related studies, and progress toward killer-whale breeding.”







photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

UK’s only koala joey is a girl!


UK’s only koala joey is a girl!

credit RZSS/Sian Addison

The UK’s only koala joey has had her first health check at the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s (RZSS) Edinburgh Zoo.

Staff at the wildlife conservation charity have confirmed that the youngster, born in July last year, is a girl and currently weighs 759g.

Keepers will now choose an Aboriginal inspired name for the young joey, as they did with her sister who was born in 2018 and named Kalari, meaning ‘daughter’.

Lorna Hughes, team leader for koalas at Edinburgh Zoo, said, “We are thrilled our youngster is doing well after her first health check.

“Like all young koala joeys, she spends most of her time clinging to her mum, so we gave her a soft toy to hold on to while she was being weighed.

“At nearly eight months old, she’s now almost too big to fit inside mum Alinga’s pouch and has started to venture outside and onto Alinga's back more regularly.”


As well as being part of the international breeding programme for Queensland koalas, RZSS supports conservation projects for the species in Australia. In January keepers at the zoo held a fundraiser for Science for Wildlife who worked to rescue koalas in the Blue Mountains region following wildfires that swept the country earlier this year. The campaign raised £1,790 and gave those who donated the chance to win one of three original framed paw prints from the zoo’s koalas.









photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant

Friday, March 13, 2020

Glenmorangie forges a global conservation partnership to help save the giraffe

Image result for Glenmorangie giraffe

Glenmorangie forges a global conservation partnership to help save the giraffe

 --- Whisky recognises the serious threat its symbol faces in the wild ---


Glenmorangie has long celebrated the giraffe as a symbol of its distillery. With its extraordinary height, the animal perfectly illustrates the stature of the single malt whisky’s towering stills. Today, the Highland Distillery demonstrates its commitment to this endangered animal by forging a global conservation partnership to help safeguard its future.

 Glenmorangie’s affinity with the giraffe begins with its towering copper stills in which it creates its lighter spirit, with more space for taste and aroma. The tallest in Scotland, these stills have necks the same height as an adult male giraffe. But although the giraffe’s silhouette is known and loved at Glenmorangie, as it is across the world, few are aware of the threat it faces in the wild. Numbers have fallen by 30% in 30 years, with some types of giraffe now critically endangered. With the giraffe’s decline going largely unnoticed, a BBC/PBS documentary on the work of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) and its partners, narrated by Sir David Attenborough has warned of a “silent extinction”.

 In a concerted effort to aid the giraffe, Glenmorangie is pioneering a three-year partnership with the Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) and the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS). This two-pronged approach will support efforts to protect giraffes in the wild in Africa and provide a habitat for the animal at Edinburgh Zoo, which will play a vital role in their conservation.
  
Under the partnership Glenmorangie will:

Enable GCF’s work in Africa, with a focus on Uganda. GCF is the world’s only organisation concentrating solely on the conservation and management of giraffes in the wild throughout Africa. They are committed to securing a future for all giraffe populations in the wild.
Support RZSS in creating a giraffe habitat at Edinburgh Zoo. Opening in the summer of 2020, this specially-designed habitat will help aid conservation in the wild through genetic research to support GCF’s translocation efforts, and raise visitors’ awareness of the threats facing the species.
  

Thomas Moradpour, President and Chief Executive of The Glenmorangie Company, said: “For 175 years we have created whisky, in stills as high as an adult giraffe, the tallest in Scotland. Over time, this majestic animal has become a beloved symbol our brand. It seems only right that we should channel our passion for this animal into our new global conservation partnership with GCF and RZSS. Together, we will work to protect giraffes in the wild and shine a light on their predicament before it’s too late.”





photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant

THREE YOUNG NATURE CONSERVATIONISTS BEAT 121 OTHER CONTESTANTS AND WIN INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGIOUS PRIZE


THREE YOUNG NATURE CONSERVATIONISTS BEAT 121 OTHER CONTESTANTS AND WIN INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGIOUS PRIZE

The Future For Nature Foundation supports young, inspiring natural leaders that fight uphill battles for the conservation of species in Venezuela, Nigeria and Bolivia with €50.000.


Arnhem, 12 March 2020. Out of one hundred and twenty-four candidates from all over the world three inspiring natural leaders in nature conservation were chosen to be this year’s winners of the Future For Nature Award. On Friday, May 8th 2020, María Fernanda Puerto-Carrillo (Venezuela), Iroro Tanshi (Nigeria), and Tjalle Boorsma (the Netherlands / Bolivia) will receive this prestigious nature conservation prize and 50,000 euros each during the Future For Nature Award Event at Royal Burgers’ Zoo. In the past this internationally renowned prize was presented by icons such as Sir David Attenborough and Dr. Jane Goodall.

Talented Nature Conservationists From Venezuela, Nigeria and the Netherlands
The current crisis in Venezuela has made conservation work hard and often dangerous. María Fernanda Puerto-Carrillo (33 years old) is one of the last ones standing and even more passionate and determined to protect the jaguar and its habitat than before.
 
The Nigerian Iroro Tanshi (35 years old) rediscovered a population of the Short-tailed Roundleaf bat in Nigeria (last seen 45 years ago) and is on a mission to protect the last known roost that is under threat of fruit bat hunting and wildfires. Her ‘Zero Wildfire Campaign’ already resulted in zero wildfire reports in 2019 during the dry season.

The Dutch Tjalle Boorsma (35 years old) left his homeland to stop the decline of Bolivia’s most threatened birds, the Blue-throated Macaw. He discovered their previously unknown nesting sites and gained crucial information for designing a conservation programme for these amazing birds. 

These three nature conservation heroes will receive the Future For Nature Award on May 8th 2020 in Royal Burgers’ Zoo, the Netherlands.

International Celebrities Support the Work of Future For Nature
The Future For Nature Awards will be presented at Royal Burgers’ Zoo for the thirteenth consecutive year in 2020. The internationally recognised nature conservation prize was presented in the past by Sir David Attenborough, Dr. Jane Goodall, Dr. Frans de Waal and Doutzen Kroes. During the tenth edition, His Royal Highness King Willem-Alexander was the Guest of Honour. 

The event will be livestreamed on the Future For Nature Facebook page and YouTube channel, so save the date!





photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant



Covid-19: Lack of research capacity risks future pandemics


Image result for covid 19

Covid-19: Lack of research capacity risks future pandemics

Leading scientists call for substantial investment in wildlife health research
ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON

The UK should invest in better understanding of diseases in wildlife populations, and the routes to these becoming human diseases to drastically reduce the risk of future - possibly even worse - global pandemics like COVID-19. That is the conclusion of scientists at ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) Institute of Zoology, which specialises in understanding so-called 'zoonotic diseases' - those that transfer from wildlife to humans.
The UK Government has committed £46 million to Covid-19 vaccine development. While an effective vaccination programme is vital to the short-term response to the disease - and should be prioritised - longer-term preventative research must not be ignored, according to ZSL.
Many of the biggest threats to public health including Covid-19, SARS, Ebola and Zika, began as infections that transfer from animals to humans. At least 61% of all human pathogens (agents that cause disease) are 'zoonotic', and approximately 75% of all new human diseases identified in recent years have come via this route.
Yet there is still much we don't understand about how human expansion into wildlife habitats, closer contact with wild animal populations and the growth of the (legal and illegal) global trade in wildlife, increases the risk of cross-species disease transmission.
Wildlife health researchers and conservationists at ZSL (Zoological Society of London) are therefore calling on the UK Government and philanthropy to join forces and invest in a UK-based dedicated centre of excellence to understand the reservoirs of diseases in wildlife, the possible routes of transmission to other animals - and to humans - and ways to prevent zoonotic epidemics before they start.
Dominic Jermey CVO OBE Director General of ZSL says: "No-one knows how many infections circulate in wildlife populations or under what circumstances they could create the next human pandemic. But if we know the risk factors for zoonotic virus spill-over, we can put in place safety measures to stop it happening in the first place without adversely affecting wild animals in which the viruses occur naturally. These links between wildlife and human health are increasingly recognised but still very poorly understood. Often public health research, practice and the implementation of policy happens without consideration of how natural systems work, and the pathways through which people's health is affected by wildlife's."
The World Health Organisation (WHO) recognises the necessity of this approach stating: "Addressing [zoonoses] requires collaborative, cross-sectoral efforts of human and animal health systems and a multidisciplinary approach that considers the complexities of the ecosystems where humans and animals coexist."
Jermey adds: "ZSL has 200 years' experience as leaders in this field. Our research has furthered medical understanding of many diseases including Ebola and tuberculosis. The scale and frequency of emerging zoonoses like Covid-19 however, calls for a step change in investment. We are seeing widespread reforms in British science so I hope the Government will take this opportunity to make multi-disciplinary wildlife health research the priority it must be to prevent similar pandemics in future."




photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant