Friday, May 24, 2019

Zoo News Digest 24th May 2019 (ZooNews 1027)

Zoo News Digest 24th May 2019  (ZooNews 1027)


Schmidt's red-tailed monkey
Louisville Zoo @LouisvilleZoo



elvinhow@gmail.com

 

Dear Colleague,


It was with mixed emotions yesterday to find that Facebook had somehow fixed itself. The comments section had somehow fixed itself. That's good I thought and clicked on the button. Then horror as there were hundreds of them spanning the last two weeks. I skimmed down them and then clicked 'mark as read'. I simply don't have the time to go through them. As is often the case with comments the commenters have not read the article anyway or, and I never quite understand why, believe that I have written the article in the first place.
The other problem with yesterday was finding that the last ZooNews Digest had not actually gone out to subscribers. No idea why. Posted it out again. We shall see.

Man holding 98 orcas and belugas in ‘whale prison’ refuses to free them See below. This has all the beginnings of a 'rescue'... which won't be a rescue... like so many it will really be a purchase and I don't suppose there is any organisation out there that has the money to do it.

See below - Animal rights activists score win at Barcelona zoo
"restrict the breeding of captive animals unless their young are destined to be reintroduced into the wild" - WHAT WILD?... It is the policy of GOOD zoos, like Barcelona to re-introduce genetically viable populations into a suitable wild that is not being poached, polluted or encroached upon by man. That time may not be now but in a 100 years from now. These Animal Rights Anarchists are dooming some species to extinction.

If I had to make a wish for the week it would be that those facilities holding Crocodilians learned the difference between teasing and enrichment. They are not difficult animals and really, honestly what purpose does sitting on them serve?



"good zoos will not gain the credibility of their critics until they condemn the bad zoos wherever they are." Peter Dickinson

Lots of interest follows

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Did You Know?
ZooNews Digest has over 110,400+ Followers on Facebook( and over 110,500 likes) and has a monthly reach often exceeding over 1000,000 people? That ZooNews Digest has subscribers in over 900 Zoos in 155+ countries? That the subscriber list for the mail out reads like a 'Zoos Who's Who?'
If you are a subscriber to the email version then you probably knew this already. You would also know that ZooNews Digest pre-dates any of the others. It was there before FaceBook. It was there shortly after the internet became popular and was a 'Blog' before the word had been invented. ZooNews Digest reaches zoo people.

I remain committed to the work of GOOD zoos,
not DYSFUNCTIONAL zoos.
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Chester Zoo's baby elephant Indali could be given all clear in weeks
Two-year-old Asian elephant calf Indali Hi Way remains in remission at Chester Zoo as she recovers from a killer disease.

Indali had been fighting for her life after a blood test revealed she had developed Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV).

But the zoo responded promptly with Indali undergoing intensive daily treatments including nine anaesthetic procedures, innovative blood plasma transfusions, interferon therapy, anti-viral medications and immune boosting treatments.



Animal rights activists score win at Barcelona zoo
Animal rights activists in Barcelona are celebrating a victory after the Spanish city ordered its municipal zoo to restrict the breeding of captive animals unless their young are destined to be reintroduced into the wild.

Barcelona's town council voted on May 3 to modify the zoo's bylaws to include a rule to eventually halt breeding programs unless there is a plan to release the offspring into nature at some point.



Breeding restrictions in Barcelona spark debate on role of zoos
Animal rights activists in Barcelona are celebrating a victory after the Spanish city ordered its municipal zoo to restrict the reproduction of captive animals unless their young are destined to be reintroduced into the wild.

Barcelona’s town council voted on May 3 to modify the zoo’s bylaws to include a rule by which any of its breeding programmes will be stopped unless there is a plan to eventually release the offspring into nature.



Armed with goggles and snorkels, a couple of canoeists saved a rare turtle from extinction
If not for the dogged determination of a couple of sharp-eyed canoeists and then a raft of agencies and scientists, a much-loved turtle found only in a single river of northern NSW would be no more.

In early 2015, Rowan Simon and a friend were canoeing on the Bellinger River about 10 kilometres up stream from Bellingen when they spotted a snapping turtle on a rock. Surprisingly, it didn't move as they paddled up.



At home with the hyenas of Harar
Most people know hyenas as a weird kind of ugly and ferocious wild dog that feasts on carrion and preys upon other wild animals, ravaging its victims in a voracious frenzy of pack attack. They not only laugh but they also howl, whoop, grunt, growl, yell and whine. They will prey on baby lions and fearlessly fight adult lions off their meals. They are known to kill humans and each other. And a group of hyenas can



Vol 34, No 5 (2019): May
Full Issue



Conservation Charity Marwell Zoo Launches Moo Free Chocolates
Famous conservation charity Marwell Zoo has invested heavily in Moo Free’s ethical free-from chocolates. From this week, Marwell Zoo will stock almost all the bars in Moo Free’s premium range, their entire snack-sized Mini Moos offering, their two 100g nut bars and the ever-popular lunchtime-perfect Choccy Chums Surprises.

Animals and Politics: Traveling Exotic Animal Ban Reintroduced
On May 21, 2019 Representatives Raul M. Grijalva (D-AZ) and David Schweikert (R-AZ) introduced the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act (TEAPSPA), a bill that would amend the federal Animal Welfare Act to prohibit the use of exotic and wild animals, including lions, tigers and elephants, in traveling performances. The bill had previously been introduced in 2017. The bill does not apply to domestic or farm animals or nonmobile, permanent zoo and aquarium facilities that are accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) or the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS).



The barking deer enigma
Most forests in India are home to the Indian muntjac, also called barking deer. Found across southern India, including the Western Ghats, in the dry forests of central India, the evergreen temperate forests of the Himalayas and the dense rainforests of northeast India, Indian muntjacs are a quiet and solitary species.

Relegated to a list of prey animals for carnivores like tigers, leopards and dholes in India, they are rarely studied for their own sake and so very little is known ab




Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica
Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap—wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.



Botswana lifts ban on elephant hunting
After a five-year suspension, the government of Botswana has decided once again to allow sport hunters to kill elephants, according to a statement issued on May 22 by the Ministry of Environment, Natural Resource Conservation and Tourism.



Man holding 98 orcas and belugas in ‘whale prison’ refuses to free them
The owner of a group of beluga whales and orcas being held in cages in Russia has said he is not planning to release the marine mammals.

“Any question regarding their release may be posed only after I’m deprived of the ownership rights, what release are you talking about?” Alexei Reshetov said.

Mr Reshetov is director general of Afalina, the company which owns the illegally captured animals.



In a first, chimpanzees seen smashing and eating tortoises
In a paper published today in the journal Scientific Reports, scientists report seven chimpanzees breaking open forest hinge-back tortoises in Gabon’s Loango National Park. The behavior occurred on multiple occasions over 5,000 hours of observation, and the primates often shared the meat with others in their group.

This is the first time than any chimpanzee has been documented eating any kind of reptile. It’s also unique because the way in which the primates eat these tortoises—slamming them against tree branches and trunks—is a type of “percussive” technology that is akin to tool use, says study coauthor Simone Pika, who studies chimpanzees at Germany’s University of Osnabrück.



PANDA PAD STORM Edinburgh Zoo in dispute with Scottish Government after demanding £2.5m for panda enclosure for Sunshine and Sweetie
NATS agreed a secret £2million grant to build a new den for Scotland’s pandas — after zoo chiefs threatened to block a windfall for taxpayers.

Bosses at the Edinburgh attraction demanded cash claiming building work on a neighbouring NHS site flogged for £6million could kill Sunshine and Sweetie.



Mouse deer breeding yields good results
After seven years of conservation breeding of the elusive species at a dedicated facility on the premises of Nehru Zoological Park, the captive mouse deer population increased from 6 to about 232 till March 2019. Meanwhile, the first batch of eight individuals was released into the wild on July 17, 2018. So far, a total number of 72 individuals in eight batches were released.



36-Koala Industry Ranking - Part 2
Our current way of living has zoning laws, with residents living in close proximity to large shopping centers, schools, hospitals and recreational and leisure parks. But what if we added another element to the picture? What if we considered adding natural Australian habitat with wildlife?What gets me is that society has designed a formula that better suits them, us, and is detrimental to the most important thing in the world: nature. Humanity has replaced the natural world with a concrete jungle.



Switzerland has confirmed it's first wolf puppies born there in over 150 years! (Video)
There is a first picture that confirms it: a photo of a wolf puppy. It was also confirmed by the Office for Hunting and Fishin, Graubünden, after multiple hunters had spotted three wolf babies.

In early August, it was speculated that the wolves in Calandagebiet had babies. Now, the babies are around four months old. The reason why they were not discovered earlier is because the whole area is very rugged and there are few roads and paths. These are optimal living conditions for the little wolf family.




Wellington Zoo ditches written exit letters in wake of bullying claims
Wellington Zoo has ditched written exit letters in favour of interviews - but says the move is unrelated to multiple allegations made against some bosses.

Stuff revealed the allegations in April after being leaked two exit letters which painted a picture of staff leaving in droves because of alleged bullying from some managers.

Stuff has since talked to numerous



Lions wounded by porcupines may be more likely to attack people
In 1965, an emaciated male lion attacked and killed a villager in the Darajani region of Tsavo, Kenya. Locals led American hunter John Perrott to the animal, where he shot and killed it. While admiring his trophy shortly thereafter, Perrott noticed something unusual: a sharp quill jutting out of the lion’s left nostril.



White stork pair could become first to breed in wild in UK for centuries
White storks nesting on top of an ancient oak tree could become the first wild pair to successfully breed in Britain for hundreds of years.

The enormous birds are brooding three eggs on the rewilded Knepp estate, in Sussex, as part of a project to reintroduce the species to south-east England.



Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas
Research carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways—including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats—but their survival is still threatened.



Time is running out for these critically-endangered species in the Philippines
According to The World Atlas, “megadiversity” refers to countries that harbor a “high total number of species including a significant percentage of endemic species.” And for a country to be classified as “megadiverse”, it must have at least 5,000 species of endemic plants and border a marine ecosystem.



Endangered Bird Returned To South Korean Wild 40 Years After Extinction
An endangered bird was reintroduced to the wild by South Korean authorities Wednesday, four decades after it went extinct on the peninsula.
The crested ibis is listed as South Korea's National Monument number 198, but was last seen in the wild in 1979 in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the peninsula.

China and Japan are also part of the species' natural range, but the species was driven to the edge of extinction -- partially because pesticide use eliminated its food sources -- until captive breeding programmes were set up.



Who do you believe?
It hasn’t been an easy week to be a killer whale trainer at Marineland, Antibes.

The week started off with a bunch of protests from animal-rights activists around the world, as part of their (now annual) Empty the Tanks Day. A small group of whom had gathered to demonstrate in front of the Marineland Hotel. Granted, there were only a handful of them, but their message was clear. Put an end to the keeping of animals in captivity. In fact, their group was so small that I didn’t even notice them as I was driving out of work th




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For Updated Conferences and Meetings Please Click
HERE

For Recent Zoo Vacancies Please Click

After more than 50 years working in private, commercial and National zoos in the capacity of keeper, head keeper and curator Peter Dickinson started to travel. He sold house and all his possessions and hit the road. He has traveled extensively in Turkey, Southern India and much of South East Asia before settling in Thailand. In his travels he has visited well over 200 zoos and many more before 'hitting the road' and writes about these in his blog http://zoonewsdigest.blogspot.com/Hubpages http://hubpages.com/profile/Peter+Dickinson
Peter earns his living as an independent international zoo consultant, critic and writer. Until recently working as Curator of Penguins in Ski Dubai. United Arab Emirates. He describes himself as an itinerant zoo keeper, one time zoo inspector, a dreamer, a traveler, an introvert, a people watcher, a lover, a storyteller, a thinker, a cosmopolitan, a writer, a hedonist, an explorer, a pantheist, a gastronome, sometime fool, a good friend to some and a pain in the butt to others.
"These are the best days of my life"


photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant








Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Zoo News Digest 22nd May 2019 (ZooNews 1026)

Zoo News Digest 22nd May 2019  (ZooNews 1026)






elvinhow@gmail.com

 

Dear Colleague,


Around 25 years ago a young girl visited the zoo on two weeks work experience. It was obvious from day one that she really didn't want to be there but as she was shy nobody pressurised her and just made her feel welcome. Two days into her placement she admitted to me that she hadn't want to come to the zoo. She liked animals and so that was where her school had told her she must go. She went on to say that she was 'Animal Rights' and had hated zoos but in just a couple of days had completely reversed her opinion. It was the keepers who changed her. She saw how much they loved and cared for the animals in their charge. This too was the start of her zoo career and all these years later she is still working in zoos.
Unique? Well no actually because I can think of two others off the top of my head who were Animal Rights but reversed their opinions having encountered good keepers who took the time to explain the work of good zoos.
One of our biggest problems with the Animal Rights Groups is that they really don't know what the work of Good zoos entails. They listen to their Fuhrers and only read the dogma put out by their anarchistic groups.
We need to educate them, to win them over to the truth... but how?
Next time they have a protest outside your zoo gate then let them in for a free tour. You are then in a position to educate them, to explain, to answer questions and if necessary condemn those bad zoos which sully our name. Good, well trained and honest keepers are in a position to change people. Truth will win out in the end.


"good zoos will not gain the credibility of their critics until they condemn the bad zoos wherever they are." Peter Dickinson

Lots of interest follows

*********

Did You Know?
ZooNews Digest has over 110,400+ Followers on Facebook( and over 110,500 likes) and has a monthly reach often exceeding over 1000,000 people? That ZooNews Digest has subscribers in over 900 Zoos in 155+ countries? That the subscriber list for the mail out reads like a 'Zoos Who's Who?'
If you are a subscriber to the email version then you probably knew this already. You would also know that ZooNews Digest pre-dates any of the others. It was there before FaceBook. It was there shortly after the internet became popular and was a 'Blog' before the word had been invented. ZooNews Digest reaches zoo people.

I remain committed to the work of GOOD zoos,
not DYSFUNCTIONAL zoos.
********
*****
***
**
*

Is This the Future of Aquariums?
Some of my fondest memories as a child were family trips from home in Rhode Island down to Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut. A fan of fantasy fiction, beluga whales always seemed to be more out of a fairy tale than real life. Over the years, I’ve made my way to world-class aquariums in Osaka, Baltimore, Monterey, Atlanta, and Medellin. And while I often feel conflicted about the creatures trapped behind the glass, I also always appreciate the educational value that comes along with the wonder they inspire.



Zoos in the CYBER activism age
Javier Almunia is director of Loro Parque Fundación, an NGO that funds and implements wildlife conservation projects in over 40 countries around the world. The mission of Loro Parque Fundación is to conserve wild species and their habitats. They do this through education, applied research, responsible breeding programs, and community-based conservation activities that use parrots and cetaceans as ambassadors for nature. He has formerly been responsible for the environmental education and marine conservation and research projects.







GRANT PROPOSALS
RECOVERY OF SPECIES ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION
The mandate of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) is to “stimulate, promote and support conservation actions for halting biodiversity decline, preventing species’ extinctions, and restoring and conserving intact habitats and ecosystems, both on the ground and in the water”. In partnership with the IUCN SSC and Fondation Segré, the goal of this request for funding is to halt further biodiversity decline by implementing conservation plans for species and groups of species. We will support priorities of IUCN SSC Species Conservation Plans as well as conservation actions that are endorsed by the relevant IUCN SSC Species Specialist Group. Currently, we are not supporting biodiversity assessments or conservation planning activities.



Dutch Political Party Targets Zoos and Aquariums
From the outside, DierAnimal may look like any environmental-based political party that works to find methods that are aimed at improving the environment and help troubled animals. After all, any cause that is aimed at helping animals, and the planet are noble causes that we can all agree to on so many levels, However, what some supporters and zoo and aquarium professionals may now know is that DierAnimal has its very own hidden agenda that they should all need to look out for. What is that agenda you may ask? They target zoos and aquariums with the aim at “phasing” them out.



Isko Moreno vows Arroceros Forest Park, Manila Zoo won’t be sold
Manila mayor-elect Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso has assured that Arroceros Forest Park and Manila Zoo will not be sold.

“I made a commitment before election and even yesterday when I was being interviewed by another outfit, na we will protect and we will not sell. We will develop Arroceros Park because that’s the only breathing space for Lawton sa Manila,” Domagoso said Sunday during an interview with dzMM.



Bonobo sex study finds apes set up with lovers by own MUMS
Mums have been found to be encouraging their sons to be in close proximity to ovulating females and preventing other males from hooking up with other females.

They have also been observed protecting their sons from other males during copulation, according to a team from the Max Planck Institute in Germany.



 Association of Zoos and Aquariums Selects Ten Outstanding Candidates for 2019 Professional Development Program
Ten talented aquarium and zoo professionals were selected for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Executive Leadership Development Program (ELDP), now in its sixth year. Based on a survey of directors at AZA aquariums and zoos, it is estimated that there will be approximately 20 zoo or aquarium director openings ‎per year for the next 10 years at facilities accredited by AZA. Knowing this, the AZA is proactively providing development opportunities for next generation leaders of AZA-accredited zoological facilities through the ELDP. AZA has announced the 2019 class, which consists of the following ten individuals:



Five endangered kākāpō die in month from fungal disease
First it was crusty bum, now the rare and endangered kākāpō is falling victim to a fungal disease called aspergillosis, with five dead over the last month and another not expected to live.

Thirteen of the flightless parrots - the heaviest in the world - are being treated in Auckland Zoo for the disease, which is very difficult to treat.



 At 'nonprofit' Global Wildlife Center, who's getting rich? 'For the animals' line called a sham
But the park's wholesome, family-friendly reputation is under fire. Former employees are criticizing the care given to the animals, saying accidents with the wagons are common and the injured animals are often killed with rifles, hammers or baseball bats rather than getting veterinary care.



A CLOSER LOOK AT JAPAN'S OWL CAFÉS
There is no denying that the Japanese love animals. Animal-themed items can be found everywhere (from on clothing to saké cans), and cute animals are enormously loved within Japanese culture. This is not unexpected given that cuteness is a well-established and very prevalent part of the country’s culture. But loving animals doesn’t necessarily equate to animals having a good quality of life, and in the case of animal cafés, they can cause a deprivation in even basic daily needs, as a result of people’s desire to get up close to the cute and cuddly.



Chhatbir zoo all set to get exotic animals from Africa
Apart from this, it is also going to get a pair of Asiatic l ..



How Zoos and Aquariums Are Harnessing Empathy to Save Species
Zoos and aquariums inspire wonder and forge connections to nature, but that emotional journey may be more powerful than we imagine. Most people can recall, in vivid detail, a time they experienced an emotional connection to an animal—whether visiting a zoo or aquarium or in your own backyard—we call that connection empathy.



Canada zoo owner charged with animal cruelty
A Canadian zoo owner has been charged with criminal animal cruelty and the animals on the premises are being seized by authorities.

The owner of the St-Édouard Zoo in Quebec faces two counts of cruelty and neglect covering over 100 animals at the zoo.

They include lions, tigers, zebras, bears, wolves, kangaroos and primates.

Authorities say their relocation to other facilities is expected to take "a number of weeks".

The Montreal SPCA were following up on a complaint from the public when it launched an investigation into the zoo after a visit to the facility last August.



Highland Wildlife Park captive breeding rare hoverflies
A Scottish captive breeding programme aims to boost numbers of one of the UK's rarest insects.

The pine hoverfly Blera fallax is currently known to only inhabit one forest site in the Cairngorms National Park.

Conservationists estimate there are fewer than 50 flies at the location.

The Highland Wildlife Park at Kincraig, near Aviemore, is raising hoverflies in old jam jars and hummus pots. The first adult flies have just hatched.



The Philippines Rallies Behind a “Feisty” Dwarf Buffalo
On a Filipino island about half the size of New Jersey, there lives a species of shaggy, black dwarf buffalo that’s slightly taller than a yardstick. The animal is known as the tamaraw, and while it looks a bit like a water buffalo, you can easily distinguish this species by its backward-facing set of horns that resemble an open-mouthed Pac-Man.

Oh, and the tamaraw will also be the species charging at you from the underbrush if you get too close. The animals have a reputation for, let’s say, standoffishness.



As other zoos phase out elephant exhibits, Milwaukee County bets future on theirs
The Milwaukee County Zoo is betting millions, and much of its future, on its new elephant exhibit at a time when many other zoos are getting out of the elephant business entirely.

The zoo's new 20,000-square-foot habitat will be a new home to elephants Brittany and Ruth.



Rome's Bioparco faces closure
City owes Rome zoo arrears of €3 million in public funds.
Rome's Bioparco is "at risk of closure" due to the non-payment of €3 million by the city, which provides one third of the zoo's funding, according to Bioparco president Francesco Petretti.

The public funds, of which €1 million is owed from 2018 and €2 million from this year, have yet to be paid despite being included in the municipal investment plan up to 2020, according to Italian daily newspaper Corriere della Sera.

Petretti says the financial uncertainity, which has resulted in the zoo stalling plans for upgrading works, has been hampered further by Rome's cold and rainy spring.



Beluga surgery at Marineland an international effort
A beluga whale named Tank is recovering at Marineland after a successful surgery to remove an abscess, a surgery which was aided by a team of international experts.

An abscess was discovered on the whale's back during a routine weekly medical checkup earlier this month.

While abscesses occur in mammals naturally, they require treatment to prevent serious health complications or even death.

Following a full examination, including an ultrasound, Marineland's veterinary care team and its animal welfare committee reached out to an international institution for assistance.






WHAT'S NEW AT BASEL ZOO - ZOO BASEL DISAPPOINTED BY OZEANIUM’S DEFEAT IN REFERENDUM
Zoo Basel has acknowledged that the Basel electorate voted against the Ozeanium today. In spite of this result, Basel Zoo will continue to promote nature and species conservation as well as marine conservation.

Zoo Director Oliver Pagan is disappointed with today’s outcome: ‘For over ten years, we have poured our heart and soul into the Ozeanium project, and I would be lying if I said that I was not disappointed.’ He added: ‘It is even more of a shame because we are pursuing the exact same aim that many of our adversaries claim is also very close to their own hearts: marine conservation.’
https://www.zoobasel.ch/en/aktuell/detail.php?NEWSID=1211&fbclid=IwAR0XSP42L7Y8Zr3I04CtxcUb7_hHZaA25cETpOTxq4ZACzvjmwkxkpAnemg



Rare prewar photos showing sea lion hunt on Takeshima found
Prewar photos documenting the hunting of sea lions on the Takeshima islets in the Sea of Japan have been discovered, providing a rare glimpse into the now-extinct industry.

Thirteen photographs were taken in June 1934 when an Asahi Shimbun reporter and a photographer joined fishermen in Shimane Prefecture in their hunt for sea lions at Takeshima off Shimane Prefecture.

Rikinobu Funasugi, an associate professor of geography at Shimane University who researches sea lion hunting on Takeshima, hailed the cache as a significant find.



Martin Clunes elephant ride: Is animal tourism always exploitative?
This week Martin Clunes was dropped as a patron of an animal charity for climbing on an elephant in Nepal. From swimming with dolphins to cuddling lion cubs, wildlife tourism is a mammoth industry but what is the impact on the animals we claim to adore?

Whether it’s swimming with dolphins in the Florida Keys, riding an elephant on a remote Thai island or bottle-feeding a lion cub at a South African petting facility, the bucket lists of many UK holidaymakers are likely to feature at least one animal-based experience.




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** ***
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***
*

For Updated Conferences and Meetings Please Click
HERE

For Recent Zoo Vacancies Please Click

After more than 50 years working in private, commercial and National zoos in the capacity of keeper, head keeper and curator Peter Dickinson started to travel. He sold house and all his possessions and hit the road. He has traveled extensively in Turkey, Southern India and much of South East Asia before settling in Thailand. In his travels he has visited well over 200 zoos and many more before 'hitting the road' and writes about these in his blog http://zoonewsdigest.blogspot.com/Hubpages http://hubpages.com/profile/Peter+Dickinson
Peter earns his living as an independent international zoo consultant, critic and writer. Until recently working as Curator of Penguins in Ski Dubai. United Arab Emirates. He describes himself as an itinerant zoo keeper, one time zoo inspector, a dreamer, a traveler, an introvert, a people watcher, a lover, a storyteller, a thinker, a cosmopolitan, a writer, a hedonist, an explorer, a pantheist, a gastronome, sometime fool, a good friend to some and a pain in the butt to others.
"These are the best days of my life"


photo 
Peter Dickinson
Independent International Zoo Consultant